NBA 76ers #25 Ben Simmons White Stitched Jersey

NBA 76ers #25 Ben Simmons White Stitched Jersey

Ben Simmons doesn’t seem to care for his ranking in NBA 2K18. Could the Philadelphia 76ers forward be protesting a low mark?

As the rankings for the NBA 2K18 continue to turn up, the reactions have been mixed all around. Joel Embiid was notably dissatisfied with his 86 earlier in the offseason, while Dwyane Wade and John Wall are just a couple of names who have spoken out against their ratings.

The Philadelphia 76ers‘ 2K controversy hasn’t stopped at Embiid, though. Markelle Fultz was labeled as an 80, making him one of the most highly rated rookies in recent memory (right alongside Lonzo Ball). Now, Ben Simmons won’t even Tweet his out his rating.

While there’s a long thread I won’t re-paste into this article, I will hit the highlights. Ronnie 2K, who helps market the game, sent Simmons his rating in private. Simmons decided against posting it, and in turn engaged in a lengthy discussion about how he was (or wasn’t) upset about the tally he was given.

In convoluted fashion, Simmons arrived at the central point of his argument: he doesn’t play 2K, so why bother sending it out.

While that could theoretically be true, the greater likelihood is that Simmons is upset with where he fell. A lot of numbers have been trending upwards in this year’s game, and Fultz and Ball’s 80-overall ratings show that.

Perhaps that’s what Simmons is upset about.

The numbers for 2K aren’t arbitrary. They’re a composite score based on an evolving set of statistical categories that are combined into a single analysis of that player’s talent. That means actual on-court production in the leading catalyst for changes in rankings.

That’s where Simmons finds himself in a tough spot.

While all rookies get fresh ratings to kick off their career, Simmons has been in the system for an entire season without playing. Even if he saw major improvement through rehab and further training — which he most likely did — there’s no way for stats to show that.

The statistics Simmons’ rating is based on now are the same statistics that measured him out at 79 in 2K16.

If that were to be the case, you could plausibly link this whole thing to the Sixers’ overarching feud with the Lonzo Ball and his father. Simmons was the one who cracked the “crazy pills” comment on draft night, which spilled over into a longer conflict between LaVar Ball and Joel Embiid.

With Ball being an 80 and Simmons have the virtue of experience under and NBA training staff, ranking the second-year rookie behind the former UCLA standout would be lamentable. Simmons should be marked higher than Fultz for that matter, and being pegged below that 80 threshold in general would be understandably frustrating.

2K ratings aren’t all that important in the grand scheme of things, but it’s understandable for Simmons to feel slighted if his rating is on the lower end of the spectrum — especially when compared to those whose numbers have no right being higher.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *