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Eagles Michael Vick White Nike Men NFL Limited Jersey

Eagles Michael Vick White Nike Men NFL Limited Jersey

It’s every team’s nightmare to lose a starting quarterback at this point in the year and it happened to the Miami Dolphins, who will be without Ryan Tannehill for at least part of the season and maybe all of it. He injured his knee in practice on Thursday.

Tannehill’s injury got me to wondering what the Chiefs might do if they lost their starting quarterback, Alex Smith, for a significant period of time. For many years before his arrival, the position was unsettled for the Chiefs. Smith stabilized it: Kansas City is 41-20 in four regular seasons with him as the starter.

There’s no way to overstate what kind of loss that would be at this point for the Chiefs. Their top backups, Tyler Bray and rookie Patrick Mahomes II, have ability and the Chiefs might be able to win a game or two with one of them if Smith’s absence was a short one.

For the long term, the Chiefs would be better served finding a veteran to fill the position. Their best option at this late date might be a quarterback already in their camp, though he’s not here in a playing capacity.

Michael Vick is serving as a coaching intern at training camp. He’s 37 and hasn’t played since 2015, when he got into five games for the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Otherwise, he would make a lot of sense for the Chiefs should an emergency arise. Vick knows the offensive system, having played for Chiefs coach Andy Reid. Vick’s best NFL season came in 2010, playing for Reid with the Philadelphia Eagles.

It would be a desperation move for the Chiefs. But there’s no more desperate moment for an NFL team than losing its starting quarterback in training camp.

Reid coached Vick when the quarterback played for the Philadelphia Eagles from 2009 to 2012.

In May, Vick told the Howard Eskin Podcast that he’d talked with Reid about coaching alongside him.

“Yeah, well, he just wanted to get my thoughts, but we haven’t talked about it since,” Vick said then. “But if I could coach with anybody, I would love to start out with Andy if there was an opportunity. Obviously, I would love it with the Falcons as well. So we’ll see how it goes.”

Vick was the first and only quarterback to surpass 1,000 rushing yards in a season in league history. His time with the Falcons came to an abrupt end in 2007 when he was sentenced to 23 months in prison for running a dogfighting operation.

He returned to play for the Eagles, was named Comeback Player of the Year in 2010 and made the Pro Bowl for the fourth time in 2010.

This is not a column that is against Michael Vick’s participation in the Bill Walsh Diversity Coaching Fellowship with the Kansas City Chiefs. Nor is it a column that supports Vick’s participation as a coaching intern under coach Andy Reid.

Instead, I’m writing about the complicated story underlying Vick’s crimes, his criminal justice punishment, his reinstatement into the NFL and his future as a citizen — whether that includes coaching high school, college or professional athletes, or working at Starbucks, selling life insurance or handling bags for a large airline.

There is no need to rehash Vick’s atrocious participation in animal cruelty. He served over a year and a half at a federal penitentiary followed by a three-year probation sentence. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell conditionally reinstated Vick, and he signed and played with the Eagles from 2009 to 2012 under Reid, then another year after Reid’s departure.

As a criminologist, I have long been interested in the very controversial issue of race and crime. I love the game of football, and I also happen to love dogs. I put those interests into a study published in Social Science Quarterly that I conducted with several colleagues in which we sought to examine attitudes toward Vick’s criminal justice punishment and his subsequent reinstatement.

During the fall of 2009, we collected data via a random-digit dial sample of 420 adults and asked them two straightforward questions: Did participants think “Michael Vick’s criminal punishment of serving 18 months in prison for running a dogfighting ring for years” was “too harsh,” “too soft” or “just right”? And did they “agree with the NFL commissioner’s decision to allow Vick to return to the NFL”? Response options were “disagree” and “agree.”

Initially, we found that only 12 percent of respondents thought his punishment was “too harsh,” with the remainder evenly split between “too soft” or “just right.” Respondents were also slightly more likely to agree with Goodell’s reinstatement decision. Yet when we considered whether there were race differences with respect to these responses, we were struck by the findings.

We found that 31 percent of non-whites thought the punishment was “too harsh,” but only 9 percent of whites felt the same way.

When it came to Vick’s return to the NFL, 71 percent of non-whites agreed with Vick’s reinstatement, compared to 53 percent of whites.

These findings say a lot about attitudes toward punishment, and they say even more about attitudes toward re-entry and the ability to earn a living. And echoing a lot of what we see today about people’s experiences with the criminal justice system more generally, it showcases the important divides in how people perceive the system punishing offenders and subsequently reintegrating them back into society.

Were those attitudes about Vick driven by race? Or were they driven by the image of dogs abused and slaughtered? Or were they driven by something else? That is hard to discern in a survey, of course, but it does raise a host of many interesting questions.

There is a memorable scene in Disney’s “The Lion King,” in which Rafiki tells Simba, “Oh yes, the past can hurt. But the way I see it, you can either run from it or learn from it.” Vick will never escape his past, one that he has acknowledged, served his sentence for, and returned to society by becoming involved in many ways to educate both the public and himself about his incomprehensible behavior.

Yet should his past be used to dictate his future? The answer you’ve arrived at in your head says much about your views about redemption and one’s prospects for change.

Alex R. Piquero is Ashbel Smith professor of criminology and associate dean for graduate programs at the University of Texas at Dallas.

Nike Steelers wholesale authentic NFL jerseys Antonio Brown Black Men’s Stitched NFL Limited Rush Jersey

Nike Steelers wholesale authentic NFL jerseys Antonio Brown Black Men’s Stitched NFL Limited Rush Jersey

Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown continues his whirlwind offseason travel schedule with a full entourage. But no matter where he is, even filming the intro for Sunday Night Football in So Cal, Brown is getting in his workouts. And it appears his traveling quarterback of choice is New York Giants QB Geno Smith.

Brown shared several videos of him and Smith doing a late-night workout, and Smith was throwing darts to Brown. This is just the latest of several workouts Brown and Smith have had this offseason.

This is great for both sides, but it’s particularly beneficial for Smith who is now the backup for Eli Manning. Smith spent four tumultuous seasons with the New York Jets before heading over to the city’s other team. Meanwhile Brown continues to grind as he prepares for the season.

Brown finished 2016 with 106 receptions, his worst season in the past four years. He’s hoping to come back in a big way and get his fifth consecutive 100+ reception season. If he does, he’ll be the first player in NFL history to accomplish such a feat.

Antonio Brown’s coach didn’t know his whereabouts Tuesday morning. No harm: Training camp doesn’t start for another month.

But Pittsburgh Steelers coach Mike Tomlin would have been interested, so Brown decided to snap a selfie. In the Jimmye Laycock Football Center, alongside the man it was named after. With a photo honoring Tomlin in the background.

“I didn’t let him know I was coming,” Brown said. “He’ll like this.”

Tomlin, of course, is one of W&M’s most famous alums, and Brown was in town for Laycock’s Colonial All-Pro Football Camp. Since his rookie season in 2010, Brown has had no other head coach. It’s been a prosperous relationship.

Brown came into the league as a sixth-round draft pick, No. 195 overall, out of Central Michiganl. All-Pros Dez Bryant and Demaryius Thomas went before him, but so did Taylor Price (five career catches), Mardy Gilyard (now in the Arena League) and Jordan Shipley (retired after three seasons).

In his NFL debut, Brown returned the opening kickoff for an 89-yard touchdown. He was the Steelers’ fifth receiver for most of the year, but he rapidly climbed the depth chart.

In his second season, Brown had 69 catches for 1,108 yards. He also had 1,134 return yards, making him the first player in league history to crack four figures in both categories. It was clear Pittsburgh had gotten — pardon the pun — a steal.

Check out Brown’s numbers over the last four seasons: 481 catches, 6,315 yards, 43 touchdowns. He’s only 5-foot-10 and 180 pounds, average size for a high school wideout. But most NFL analysts regard either him or Atlanta’s Julio Jones as the game’s best receiver.

Brown’s explanation?

“You just have to get better,” he said. “No matter where you start, it’s all about how you finish. If you get better every day, eventually it will add up.”

Like those aforementioned numbers.

In addition to his production, Brown is also known for his celebrations. Last year alone, he was flagged for twerking — “sexually suggestive,” allegedly —and a bizarre, yet hilarious slam into a goal post.

In May, the NFL announced it would relax its rules on celebrations to allow for “spontaneous exuberance.” Brown is on board.

“I’m excited about it,” he said. “The NFL did a great job to give us the opportunity to get people even more excited about how we celebrate with our teammates. Especially the offensive line, guys who don’t get to celebrate a lot.”

In Brown’s seven seasons, the Steelers have gone 72-40 in the regular season and made the playoffs five times. They lost the Super Bowl to Green Bay in his rookie year. They lost the AFC championship game to New England five months ago.

Pittsburgh has won six Super Bowls but none since 2008. Getting so close but not closing last season wasn’t fun.

“It just makes you even madder to get right there,” Brown said. “But every year presents an opportunity, and we’re excited about the journey that lies ahead of us. We know what we signed up for, and that’s our goal.”

He and Tomlin hope to do it together.

“I’ve learned a lot from him,” Brown said. “He’s a motivator, and he’s a straight shooter. He’s always inspiring his players. It’s a blessing to play for him and be around him.”

NFL jerseys are not cheap, so wholesale jerseys

NFL jerseys are not cheap, so wholesale jerseys

Nike Elite NFL Jerseys Wholesale

NFL jerseys are not cheap, so you need to make sure you know what kind of NFL jersey you are looking for before you buy.  You can choose from an Authentic NFL jersey, a personalized NFL jersey, youth NFL jerseys, women’s NFL jerseys, an NFL Throwback jersey, and many more.  We want to make it easy for you to understand the differences in all of these NFL jerseys, so you can buy NFL jerseys that meet your chinese jerseys wholesale needs and budget.

NFL Game Jerseys

The NFL Game jersey by Nike is the equivalent of the old Replica jerseys made by Reebok. These are now the cheapest NFL jerseys, selling for about $100. This comfortable, durable, lightweight jersey is great to wear just about anywhere for the avid football fan. This NFL Game Jersey is tailored for easy movement, contains no annoying neck tag, and has Silicon print numbers and letters for a softer, lighter feel. Plus, it comes with the quality of Nike. Shop NFL Game Jerseys Here.

Nike NFL Elite Jerseys – Make Your Own NFL Jersey

If you are a long time jersey buyer, you will be more familiar with the Authentic label. These are the best, most expensive NFL jerseys you can buy. Typically, they are about $250-$300 unless you have a coupon or discount. The new NFL Elite Jerseys by Nike would fit the same category (as the old Authentic) since they are the premium NFL jersey on the market today. These jerseys are fashioned after the Elite 51 NFL uniforms which will be worn by most teams. These are the most similar jerseys available when compared to the game jerseys worn on the field. They include Flywire strength around the neck area to help resist stretching of the jersey. The Zoned stretched fabrics also help reduce tearing giving the jersey more flexibility. Flexible twill numbers are sewn into the jersey. Plus, just like the NFL players have, these jerseys have strategic ventilation over all wholesale best jerseys the heat zones in your body. There is no annoying neck tag label and they are made with a fabric that repels water. The Nike NFL Elite Jersey is also customizable. You can choose any number china wholesale jerseys online with your name or choose any player. Shop NFL Elite Jerseys.

NFL Limited Jerseys by Nike

The Nike NFL Limited jersey is similar in positioning to the old NFL Premier Jerseys. It has a quality that sits in between the Elite and Game jerseys. The biggest differences between the Limited and Elite jersey is the fabric. It lacks the flexibility and stretchiness that the Elite jersey has. It still has the Flywire strength, stitched on Twill numbers, a way to keep your body cooler with strategic ventilation over the heat areas, contains no annoying neck tag, and is designed for active people. The Limited Jersey series is perhaps the best value when it comes to the look of the jersey seeming real. We beileve the Limited NFL Jerseys by Nike represent the best value in NFL Jerseys. Shop Limited Jerseys Now.

Cheap NFL Jerseys

If you do not have a lot of money, but want an NFL jersey to wear when you are watching the football games on Sunday, you may want to consider buying a jersey of a player who was recently traded away or possibly just retired.  Many times when a player leaves a team, NFL jersey shops will place those particular NFL jerseys on sale to clear out their inventory.  Often you can pick these jerseys up anywhere from $20 to $60.  To see if any of these jerseys are available for your team, you can buy a jersey here.

Youth NFL Jerseys

Since kids grow so fast, and their jerseys do not require as much material as an adult jersey, youth NFL jerseys are quite a bit cheaper.  You cannot get youth personalized NFL jerseys, but you can find cheap youth NFL jerseys that will fit your budget.  Youth NFL football jerseys also have a smaller selection of players to choose from, but each team’s elite players should have an NFL jersey available for kids.  It is extremely difficult to find youth NFL jerseys at a store, but you can get a cheap youth NFL jersey here.

Replica NFL Jerseys

Since you cannot get cheap Authentic NFL jerseys, a Replica NFL jersey may be the way to go.  Typically Replica NFL jerseys sell anywhere from $80 to $90, and you normally can choose from three to five of your team’s best players.  Replica NFL jerseys look very nice with your team colors.  However, the material used is light weight and the numbers are painted on instead of sewn on.  If you are on a tight wholesale jersey shirts budget but want a jersey for a current player on your team, a Replica NFL jersey should be your choice.

NFL Premier Jerseys

If you want the best value, you may want to consider buying an NFL Premier jersey.  This football jersey is made with nylon/polyester and is made by Reebok.  This NFL jersey offers a superb value to the customer, featuring raised appliqué numbers in front and back with the details that rival an Authentic NFL jersey.  Although personalized football jerseys are not available in the NFL Premier jersey collection, you can save over $100 versus buying an Authentic NFL jersey.  These pro football jerseys normally sell for $150 at most sports stores.  You can save by purchasing a Premier NFL jersey here.

Authentic NFL Jerseys

If you want only official NFL jerseys, you should expect to pay more.  Buying an Authentic NFL jersey gives you a lot of options.  If you desire Authentic customized NFL jerseys, they allow you to make a personalized jersey with your name and the number of your choice, or you can create your own football jersey for any player in the NFL.  These jerseys are custom ordered and will take a little longer to receive.  However, you get an Authentic NFL jersey made with the same quality and materials as the jerseys the NFL players wear each week.  These jerseys can sell for as much as $260 or more in some retail stores, but you can buy an Authentic NFL jersey here today for $240 or less.

NFL Throwback Jersey

Has your favorite NFL player retired?  Is he an NFL legend?  If so, Throwback football jerseys may be available for your favorite player.  NFL Throwback jerseys are available for NFL legends like Joe Montana, John Elway, Walter Payton, and many more.  Often times you can find an wholesale mesh jersey autographed NFL jersey when shopping for an NFL Throwback jersey.  NFL Throwback jerseys typically cost somewhere between what a Premier NFL jersey and an Authentic NFL jersey would cost, about $150 to $200.  If you want a signed NFL Throwback jersey, it will cost you more.  Shop here to find a Throwback football jersey for your favorite player.

Women’s NFL Jerseys

NFL jerseys for women are becoming more popular.  No longer do you have to wear a Replica NFL jersey that is made for men.  Now women’s NFL jerseys are available.  They are cut to fit a woman and often come in feminine colors like pink.  The selection is limited for women’s NFL jerseys, but the team’s best players are normally available.  Shop for women’s NFL jerseys here.

We hope you have found our NFL jersey buying guide helpful, and now understand the differences between Replica, Premier, Authentic, and Throwback NFL jerseys.  Share this information with anyone you know who may be shopping for a jersey.